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Simple Solutions to Help Your Child Practice the Piano

Tips for parents who want to support and encourage their kids

 

Simple Piano Practice Tips to Help Kids with Lessons

 

Attention parents!

Have you ever wondered how you can best encourage your child to practice the piano?

There are many different potential barriers to piano practice, from tiredness to busyness, and everything in between. Below I’ve outlined some tried and true simple solutions to these problems, as well as other tips to help you encourage your child to practice the piano.

How Often is Practice Required?

In the last Piano Notes post, we discussed how at the end of each weekly piano lesson, the practice tasks which I set for my five to nine year old students should be achievable after three consecutive 10 minute practice sessions. Not all piano teachers follow this pattern, but if your child is enrolled at Le Piano Academy, then that’s the volume of work they will be set. Ideally, that means that your child should be practicing for just 10 minutes every day.

But how can you help them do that?

Advice for Two Income Families

Many of my students come from families where both parents work. Because of this, they go to day care after school, and often won’t return home until 6pm, or even later. At this time of night, most young children aged 5-9 are too tired to practice. So what can you do?

The solution to this problem is actually simple: Get your child to practice 10 minutes in the morning, before they go to school. That way, they’ll be alert and awake (we all know too well that kids are morning people!). As an added bonus, having your child practice in the morning will also keep them out from under your feet while you get ready for work, or attend to your younger children.

Advice for “Extra-Curricular” Families

In addition to taking piano lessons, several of my young students participate in other extracurricular activities each week. These activities include swimming, tennis, football, dancing, gymnastics, and a range of other things. Once again, this can mean that they return home late each day, and even if they don’t return home late, they’ll often still be tired.

As before, the solution is simple: encourage your child to practice for 10 minutes in the morning, or before or after dinner.

The Best Forms of Encouragement

In my experience, bribing your child to practice (e.g. “if you practice, then you can play Minecraft on the Xbox”) and threatening punishment if they don’t (e.g. “you better practice, or we’ll stop taking you to piano lessons”) are extremely ineffective.

 

The Best Forms Of Encouragement

 

As I’ve discussed in previous posts, I structure my lessons for young beginners so that practice will be easy, achievable, and ultimately fun. It isn’t hard. So all you need to do as a parent is to remind and encourage.

One effective way to encourage your child to practice is to say something like “why don’t you go and practice what you learnt yesterday so that I can see how much you’re improving?” Most children love to receive attention, approval, and praise from their parents, so this approach tends to work a treat. Experiment and see what works for you.

[Tweet “Bribing your child to practice are extremely ineffective. #practicetweets #piano”]

 

The Final Word

Do you have difficulty encouraging your child to practice the piano? Have you found an approach that gets them playing every time? Share your thoughts in the comments below to help other parents in the Piano Notes community who are facing this age-old challenge.

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