Posts

Organising A Piano Recital: Getting Bums On Seats

Avoid the awkwardness of an empty recital

 

How To Organise A Piano Recital: Getting Bums On Seats

 

Performing in front of a big crowd may be a little intimidating for your students, but it’s a whole lot better than performing in front of no crowd.

“Proper” Advertising Vs. Word Of Mouth

If you run a big music studio or school (let’s say with 100+ students), then your recital will require proper advertising. Otherwise, it could be a rather embarrassing flop. To avoid the “flop” outcome, you’ll probably want to advertise your recital with flyers, posters, emails, newsletters, social media advertising, and more.

But if you run a smaller studio, then the good news is that most of this “proper advertising” can be avoided. Instead, it just comes down to getting organised and planning ahead.

Here’s how I do it.

3-4 Months Before The Big Day

About 3 to 4 months before a Le Piano Academy recital, I begin verbally telling my students and their parents a tentative date for the big day. That way, they can begin to plan ahead, and they’ll have the upcoming recital in the back of their minds, which is exactly where you want it at this stage.

If you start telling people any earlier than this, then the date you share is more likely to change, and they’re more likely to forget. Any later, and they may not have time to plan ahead and avoid taking family holidays or being otherwise absent on recital day.

2 Months Before The Big Day

By this stage, your venue should be confirmed, and so should your date. So this is when I print and distribute formal invitations, with ticket costs, and an RSVP date one month out from the recital date. I set the recital date for a month prior so that I have plenty of time to organise appropriate catering.

Now is also the time to design and print your tickets. I prefer professional hardcopy tickets to online booking systems, as it’s more personal. And you can easily get 200 good quality tickets for $30. If you prefer online booking, you can sell tickets with systems such as trybooking. It is easier to manage the money that way. Either way, you should be selling tickets 2 months out from the recital day.

Over The Next Month

Over the next few weeks, continue to remind your students and their parents about the recital, and the RSVP date. You don’t need to be pushy, but people do forget! A friendly reminder will generally be well appreciated.

2 Weeks Before The Big Day

2 weeks before the big day, I personally hand out tickets and other information regarding the days’ events to my students.

2 weeks before is the ideal time for ticket distribution. If you hand out tickets earlier, they’re more likely to be lost, while if you hand them out only a week prior to the recital, students may be absent and not get them on time.

Organising A Recital

If you enjoyed this post, you might also like:

 

[shareaholic app=”share_buttons” id=”7262185″]

 

Organising A Piano Recital: Choosing The Venue

You can’t hold your piano recital just anywhere. Here’s what to look for when selecting a venue…

 

How To Organise A Piano Recital: Choosing The Venue

 

Picture this:

It’s the day of your studio’s first piano recital. The tickets are sold out, your professionally-printed programs are hot off the press, and your students have been practising for weeks. The standard has been set. And it’s high.

The anticipation brews as your pianists mingle with their families in the foyer, waiting for the doors to open so they can take their seats. Finally, with well-practiced fanfare, you sweep open the doors.

The crowd surges forward. Yet as they enter the room, their faces drop. Confusion and disappointment replace the excitement and expectation. For before them they see a room of creaky floorboards and worn, mismatched chairs. At its centre: a spindly, dented upright piano.

Why Your Venue Matters

When it comes to cultivating the tone and ambience for your piano recital, one single factor has a greater influence than any other: the venue. So it’s important you make the right decision.

When choosing your venue, you need to consider factors such as size, cost, and facilities. For your recital to reflect favourably on your studio’s professionalism, you also want the venue to be professional.

The Right Size

You want a venue that can comfortably hold your students’ families and friends. A venue that’s too big will look awkward, with empty seats and space. It may also be too expensive. But a venue that’s too small won’t fit all your guests, and will be too cramped to create a great atmosphere.

 

Goethe-Institut Sydney

 

To calculate the size of the venue you will need, use the following simple formula: number of students x 4.

So, if you have 20-25 students, you’ll want a venue that can fit 80-100 people. If you have 35-40 students, you’ll want a venue that can hold an audience of 140-160 people. This formula works well, because some students will need only 3 tickets (2 parents + 1 student), others will need 2 (for themselves and their partner), and others will need 10+ because they’re bringing everyone (parents, siblings, grandparents, pet goldfish, etc.).

The Piano

Many venues such as RSLs, school halls, and church halls would be great places to hold a recital, except for one not-so-small detail: the piano. And when it comes to organising a piano recital, that’s something you can never compromise on.

 

Grand Piano

Kawai Grand Piano at the Goethe-Institut Sydney

 

You can’t hold a recital where your students are playing on an electronic keyboard, or even an upright piano. The quality of the sound suffers, and it cheapens the entire experience.

I will only hold recitals at a venue where there is a grand piano. That’s one reason why I choose to hold the Le Piano Academy recitals at the Goethe-Institut in Sydney. It’s a good size, they have a wonderful piano, and it ticks all my other recital venue boxes.

To Kitchen Or Not To Kitchen?

I always hold an afternoon tea with light finger food and drinks after a recital. Many schools don’t offer this, presumably because of the cost. But there are many pros to holding an afternoon tea after your recital.

To begin with, an after-recital afternoon tea provides an occasion for your students and their families to get to know one another in a social setting. There aren’t usually many opportunities to do this, so a get together is a great way to facilitate it. But if you’re going to have a get together, you need food and drinks!

 

Drinks During Intermission

Serving drinks during intermission break to keep the punters happy 

 

Another reason to hold an afternoon tea is that it helps to ensure that your students and their families will stay for the full event, so you’ll have a full audience throughout. This also means that your students will be present for the awards presentation at the end.

Costs vary, but if you hold a recital for 150-160 people like I did last year, you’re looking at $800-1200 for food, and about $300 for drinks. The cost will depend on the type of food you get and the number catering staff you hire, but this is a good indicator. I use All Suburbs Catering Service for my catering.

Easily-Forgotten Necessities

This one doesn’t really require elaboration, but you’d be surprised how many venues don’t have bathroom facilities. Be sure to check that yours does!

You also want a venue with a foyer area. Babies cry, kids get fidgety, and every now and then there’s a phone call that just can’t wait. By choosing a venue with a foyer, you’ll be able to ensure that your recital runs more smoothly, with limited interruptions.

Your Recital

The secret’s out – if you want to hold a professional piano recital for your studio, then you need a venue that’s not too big or too small, that has a quality grand piano, and that includes facilities such as a kitchen, bathrooms, and a foyer.

Do you hold piano recitals for your piano studio? What do you look for in a potential recital venue?

Have you been to a music school’s piano recital? What did you like about the venue? What didn’t you like? Let me know in the comments below!

Organising A Recital

If you enjoyed this post, you might also like:

 

[shareaholic app=”share_buttons” id=”7262185″]

How To Organise A Piano Recital For Your Music Studio

Piano recitals take a lot of organisation and effort. But if you do it right, the results are worth it!

 

Organising A Piano Recital for Your Studio

 

Performance opportunities are incredibly important for piano students (and other music students).

Performing in front of an audience allows piano students of all ages to prepare for piano exams, practise goal setting, and develop their confidence – both personally and as a musician. (To read a full list of performance benefits, click here.)

Annual Piano Recitals

At Le Piano Academy, one thing that sets our studio apart is the fact that our students participate in an annual studio piano recital. You can see the highlight video from our 2014 recital below.

Organising the annual recital consumes hours of my time every year, as every detail is carefully planned and executed. But it’s definitely worth it!

Organising Your Piano Recital

I’ve had a lot of questions from other music teachers and from interested parents about how I organise a piano recital. So over the next few weeks, we’ll be discussing various aspects of organising a recital, from choosing a venue, through to ensuring the program runs smoothly on the day.

As each post is written, you’ll find a link to it here:

In The Meantime

In the meantime, if you have any questions about organising a piano recital, please share them in the comments below, and I’ll be sure to get back to you. I may even answer your question with a blog post! So ask away.

 

 

[shareaholic app=”share_buttons” id=”7262185″]

 

Why Student Performances Are Great For Music Teachers

Live music is a winner all round

 

Why Student Performances Are Great For Piano Teachers

 

Music students enjoy a range of benefits when they have the opportunity to perform. But student performances are also great for piano teachers. Here’s why…

(To learn about why music students need performance opportunities, read my last post.)

See How Students Perform Under Pressure

Perhaps the biggest benefit I enjoy as a piano teacher when I watch my students play live is to see how they perform under pressure.

Does their posture suffer? Do they stumble over any difficult passages? Where do they make mistakes? How do they recover from their mistakes?

Knowing this gives me the information I need to tailor their piano lessons as I work with them on their performance skills. It also highlights areas that will need improvement before they play in their piano exam. This helps me to better prepare my students – both technically and psychologically – for sitting their next AMEB exam.

See Which Students Need More Psychological Preparation

Many of my students play perfectly in their lessons and at home. But when it comes to performance time, even if it’s a crowd of two people, they crumble.

By watching my students perform live, I can identify which students need help developing their confidence in performing. This allows me to tailor my approach to their lessons. This will usually involve words of encouragement, and teaching them simple techniques such as breathing and staying calm and relaxed under pressure. If I had never seen them perform live, I would never know that they needed this additional support.

Satisfaction

There’s really nothing better than watching your students playing live in front of their parents, grandparents, siblings, and friends. It’s even more rewarding than a string of “A” grade AMEB exams.

As a teacher you know how much work both you and your students put in to learning a new piece of music. So it’s very rewarding to see them shine as they perform live.

[Tweet “It’s very rewarding to see them shine as they perform live. #piano #pianist”]

 

Video Portfolios

If you read my blog regularly, you’ll know all about the importance of a video portfolio. You’ll also know that video portfolios should always be filmed live.

Student performances provide a great opportunity for a music teacher to work on their video portfolio. It’s said that a picture paints a thousand words, and I’m pretty sure a good video paints at least ten thousand words! The videos are also a wonderful lasting memento for students, who can be rightfully proud of their achievements.

[Tweet “A good #piano performance video paints at least ten thousand words! #youtube #vimeo”]

 

Live Music’s A Winner

As you can see, live music’s a winner all round – for students, parents and family, and teachers alike!

If you’re a piano teacher, do you value watching your students play live? If so, why?

For parents, how do you feel watching your son or daughter perform? Let me know in the comments!

If you enjoyed this post, don’t forget to give it a friendly “share”. You may also enjoy:

Why Music Students Need Performance Opportunities

[shareaholic app=”share_buttons” id=”7262185″]

Why Music Students Need Performance Opportunities

Composers have always intended for their music to be performed live

 

Performance Opportunies are a must for music students

 

In the days before we had smart phones, computers, TVs, or radios, a common form of family entertainment was to spend time around the piano performing and singing with one another and with guests.

Even today, people will spend hundreds of dollars to see a music artist perform songs live, when they could have spent twenty dollars buying their album and listening to the recordings.

Why do they do it? Because there’s just something magical about listening to live music. And there’s also something magical about performing it.

Every year at Le Piano Academy, my students participate in an annual piano recital. I hold these recitals because I firmly believe music students need live performance opportunities. Here’s why…

[Tweet “There’s just something magical about listening to live music #piano #pianist”]

 

Developing Confidence

As parents, we want our children to be confident. Performance opportunities help your child to develop confidence in themselves both as a musician, and as a person.

When a child plays in front of an audience, their confidence will grow. And it will get an additional boost when they receive applause at the end of their performance. Don’t believe me? Just look at the smile of this student’s face when she receives applause from the audience. It’s a magical moment.

These confidence benefits also apply to teen and adult piano students.

[Tweet “Performance opportunities help your child to develop confidence in themselves #piano #pianist”]

 

Practicing Goal Setting & Preparation

You can’t perform in front of an audience without doing some preparation first!

Knowing that they’ll be performing in front of an audience tends to give children, teens, and adults the motivation they need to prepare for the big day. (Particularly when the audience will be full of 100+ people as it is at our annual recital.) This means your child will be more likely to develop good habits of goal setting and preparation as they practice to perform – habits that they can carry with them into other areas of their life at home and at school.

Preparing For Piano Exams

Performance opportunities are also great preparation for piano exams. After all, if your child can play in front of a crowd, it will be a lot easier for them to play in front of a single examiner.

The preparation skills your child will learn when preparing for their performance are also similar to those they need when preparing for a music exam. For example, you don’t leave your practice to the last minute in either situation.

Helping Shy Students

One of the things I love about seeing my students perform live is getting to see my shy students come out of their shells and shine. There are no opportunities to be shy when you’re performing.

Of course, in order to ensure that a student enjoys this benefit, it’s important that their teacher and parents help them to mentally prepare for the big day with plenty of encouragement and psychological preparation.

Special Family Moments

Live student performances also create beautiful family moments. Little kids in particular love showing off their skills to their family and friends, and parents and grandparents love watching their child share their talents with an audience. If you film your piano recital, you also have a great memento for a family to treasure.

Why Recitals?

There aren’t many performance opportunities out there for children, teens, and adults who are learning to play the piano. Although some of my students have the opportunity to perform in competitions, most do not. That’s why I hold a piano recital each year – so my students can all enjoy the benefits of performing live.

Your Say

Have you or your child ever performed the piano live? Was it a good experience? Share your story in the comments below.

[shareaholic app=”share_buttons” id=”7262185″]

How To Choose A Piano Teacher – Part 2: The Studio

Choose the right piano teacher by looking at these simple features at their studio

 

How to Choose a Music School for your child

 

Are you considering enrolling your child (or yourself) in piano lessons? Then this is the blog series for you.

In this two-part series, we’re discussing how to choose a piano teacher, with a focus on what to look for, what you can compromise on (if absolutely necessary), and what’s non-negotiable.

Last week, we discussed what to look for in the teacher themselves. If you haven’t read that post yet, you can find it here. As a refresher, when you choose a piano teacher, you should look for the following things:

  • University qualifications (preferably B.Mus. majoring in performance)
  • AMEB qualifications (A.Mus. or L.Mus – non-negotiable)
  • Experience (someone who’s taught for 5+ years)
  • Personality (someone you “click” with)

Today, let’s look at what you should look for in the teacher’s piano studio

Cost

Generally speaking, a piano teacher’s qualifications and experience determines how much they charge for lessons. Prices range from $40 to $150 an hour; $80 an hour is the average.

Piano lessons are a big investment for any family. So it’s important to ensure you get what you pay for. $80 an hour should get you a fully-qualified teacher with a B.Mus. (majoring in performance), an A.Mus. or L.Mus. from a music examination board, and at least 10 years’ teaching experience.

Some music schools charge $80 per hour, but their teachers are not fully-qualified. The extra money goes to the school, not the teacher. As I said, if you’re going to pay that sort of money, you want to get your money’s worth. (If you do choose to go with a less-qualified teacher due to financial pressures, be sure you’re paying a less-qualified wage.)

So how do you make sure you’re getting what you pay for with a fully-qualified teacher? As I said in my last post, don’t be afraid to ask about a teacher’s experience and qualifications. You’re paying for their services, so you deserve to know.

[Tweet “Some music schools charge $80 per hour, but their teachers are not fully-qualified #piano”]

 

Location

A common-sense consideration, but an important one: try to find a local teacher located no more than 20 to 30 minutes away. While you and your child may initially be enthusiastic about lessons at the end of an hour’s drive, this enthusiasm probably won’t last.

But be sure you do travel to the teacher. While some teachers will come to you, your child (or you) will be disadvantaged by learning to play only on the piano in your home. This is especially true when it comes to recitals or exams, as a student who has only ever played on one instrument will struggle to adapt to a foreign instrument, especially under pressure.

[Tweet “A student who has only ever played on one #piano will struggle to adapt to a foreign instrument”]

Which leads us onto our next point…

Instrument

Always choose a teacher who teaches their students on a quality acoustic piano. This is non-negotiable. Your child (or you) cannot learn to play the piano properly on an electronic keyboard. While a keyboard is an acceptable instrument for beginners practicing at home, you should always learn on an acoustic piano.

(To learn more about acoustic pianos vs. electronic keyboards, check out this post.)

Studio Policy

It might seem a funny thing to look for, but it’s important to choose a piano teacher with a thorough studio policy.

A studio policy indicates that a teacher is experienced and successful, and runs their studio professionally. The policy will protect them, but it will also protect you as a client.

Look for elements in their policy that discuss:

  • Trial lessons (you don’t want to be locked into a term of lessons without having a trial first)
  • How lessons are charged (e.g. weekly, monthly, per term, or annually) and whether late fees apply
  • Policies for make-up lessons and cancellations
  • Provision of sheet music (photocopying sheet music is illegal)

This will give you a good idea of the piano teacher’s level of professionalism, experience, and ethics.

Exams

While some music schools have their own exam system, any qualifications your child (or you) obtain will not be recognised elsewhere. If piano exams are important to you, then be sure to choose a teacher who prepares students for music board exams with either AMEB, ABRSM, or Trinity.

Your teacher should also have a transcript of their students’ past exam results. Feel free to ask them to show this to you.

[Tweet “Some schools have their own exams, any qualifications obtain will not be recognised elsewhere”]

 

Performance Opportunities

I’m a big believer in providing students with performance opportunities. Performing helps your playing and confidence blossom. Ask if your piano teacher holds recitals for students, or provides them with other opportunities to perform. You can also check to see if there are photos or – better yet – videos of their students performing on their website or YouTube/Vimeo channel.

Making The Choice

Do you feel prepared to make the right choice when it comes to choosing a piano teacher and piano studio for your child (or you)?

When evaluating a piano studio, remember:

  • Make sure you get what you pay for in terms of teacher experience
  • Find a teacher near you
  • Always choose a teacher who teaches on an acoustic piano
  • Make sure there’s a studio policy to protect them and you
  • Look for a teacher who teaches AMEB, ABRSM, or Trinity
  • Make sure the studio offers performance opportunities to their students

If you have any questions or comments about this post, then please share them in the comments below. And if you enjoyed this article, don’t forget to share it on Facebook so your friends can learn how to choose a piano teacher, too!

[shareaholic app=”share_buttons” id=”7262185″]

 

Looking For A Piano Teacher?

I know a good one 😉 Read more about learning the piano with Le Piano Academy here.

 

 

Huy’s Piano Hacks: 5 Top Tips For A Great Video Portfolio

 

Tips For A Great Video Portfolio

 

Since my last post I’ve received a lot of interest about my student showcase video portfolio, “Piano Fingers”.

Among other things, I’ve been asked about how to ensure your video portfolio is professional and effective. So here are my Top 5 Tips for ensuring you have a great video portfolio for your piano studio.

#1: ALWAYS Film Live Performances

There are several problems with studio recordings, and several benefits to filming live performances.

On a studio recording, the audience has no idea how many times it took you to get that particular shot. With a live recording, you’ll show them exactly what the pianist achieved first time, because with live performances, there are no second chances.

Atmosphere is another big differentiator. Nothing matches the atmosphere of a live performance. It doesn’t matter whether you’re recording a piano student or a famous band – the live atmosphere can’t be recreated in a studio. So give your viewers the real atmospheric experience by filming your video portfolio live.

Live performances are also more real. Have you ever seen a band performing in concert, and been disappointed by the quality of their playing compared to their studio albums? A musician’s performance skills are most evident when they perform live. Show your prospective students exactly what they can expect with a live video portfolio.

#2: DON’T Film The Piano Teacher Playing

Now there is one exception to this rule: if, as a piano teacher, you also hire out for performances, then by all means include videos of yourself playing in your portfolio.

However, if you’re like me, and your number one job is as a piano teacher, then your performance skills aren’t really relevant. Instead, your students’ performance skills are what matter. That’s what’s relevant to your future students.

To draw a parallel – if you were looking for a maths tutor for your son or daughter, the teacher’s qualifications and experience may be important, but what you would really want to know is what sort of results their students achieve. In the same way, people need to see your students playing – let their fingers do the talking.

#3: ALWAYS Respect Privacy

Admittedly, this is a common sense and courteous step to take, but it still bears mentioning. It’s good ethical practice – and probably a legal requirement – to always ask permission of students (and their parents, for under 18s) before you upload videos of them playing.

In my experience, about three quarters of my students and their parents are completely happy for me to share videos of them online. They enjoy being able to show friends and family in other cities and states, and even overseas.

For those who don’t want to be online, I don’t upload their videos.

#4: Use Vimeo

There’s much that can be said about Vimeo vs YouTube, but ultimately, it comes down to what you’re trying to achieve.

After thinking long and hard about the decision, I chose to put my video portfolio on Vimeo. YouTube may have more viewers, but I wanted better quality videos, and that meant Vimeo. Because most people view the videos via my website, Vimeo’s smaller audience numbers are irrelevant. And there are no ads, so that’s a bonus for viewers.

Other benefits of Vimeo include:

  • 3 types of account (one free, two paid)
  • faster upload time (if you’re on a paid account)
  • better looking video player

If that weren’t reason enough, it’s also important to note that all the professional videographers and filmmakers are on Vimeo – so what does that tell you?

#5: ALWAYS Use a Professional Videographer (If You Can)

Presentation is everything. There’s nothing worse than a music video with poor visuals and poor sound. By using a professional videographer for your video portfolio, you will get professional looking videos with great lighting and sound, and multiple camera angles.

In addition to the importance of presentation, using a professional videographer to produce your video portfolio will also show your clients that you’re professional, and you’re not willing to cut corners. If you don’t cut corners on video, then you probably don’t cut corners at your piano studio either. And that’s incredibly reassuring for prospective students and their parents.

All videos you see on our website are courtesy of our good friends at Imaginarium Productions.

 

 

An Example

Would you like to see an example of a professionally-filmed video from my video portfolio? Watch the highlights video from the 2014 Le Piano Academy recital below.

 

 

[shareaholic app=”share_buttons” id=”7262185″]

9 Reasons Music Teachers in the “Internet Age” MUST Have a Video Portfolio

Talking the talk isn’t enough – you need to walk the walk.

 

Video Portfolios are a Must Have for Music Teachers

 

YouTube has been with us for nearly 10 years. It’s easy and free to use, and has led to the democratisation of video content in the online world.

Yet most music teachers don’t have a video portfolio with recordings of their students performing.

My question is: “why not?”

I believe that having a video portfolio is a must for any music teacher in the internet age. Below are 9 reasons every music teacher should have a video portfolio, including responses to common objections I sometimes hear.

(Want to see the Le Piano Academy video portfolio? You’ll find it here.)

#1: Testimonials Can Be Faked

“But I have testimonials on my website” is a common objection to investing in a video portfolio.

Sadly, however, the reality is that testimonials can be faked. As such, any sensible prospective students would naturally prefer more proof. But they can’t always get it.

Unlike testimonials, student performances cannot be faked. When you record one of your students playing the piano (or whatever instrument you teach), that’s real and powerful. As such, a video portfolio provides indisputable proof of your abilities as a music teacher.

[Tweet “Video portfolio provides indisputable proof of your abilities as a Music Teacher #piano #pianist”]

 

#2: Portfolios Give Prospective Students a Taste of What They Will Learn

Videos of your students performing can also provide prospective students with an idea of what they can expect from enrolling in your music academy. Your videos will give them a taste of the repertoire they will learn, and the standards they can expect to reach. It also demonstrates how professional you are as a teacher.

Watching the videos in your portfolio is basically a try-before-you-buy experience for prospective students. And if what they’re “trying” is quality, they’ll be interested in “buying”.

#3: They Make a Great Take-Home Gift for Parents and Students

I record all my students’ performances at our studio’s annual recital. Afterwards, I give my students copies of their performance. They can also purchase a Blu-ray disc of the entire concert.

Because I have my video work done professionally, all my students and their parents love receiving copies of their performances. This means that as a music teacher, having a video portfolio plays a dual role, as it’s also a great “extra” to offer your clients.

#4: “Everyone Else” is Doing It

Members of other industries often have portfolios on their website, demonstrating their expertise in their area. For instance, builders have photos and/or videos of the homes they have built, while graphic designers have galleries filled with the logos they’ve designed. So why don’t music teachers have portfolios too?

#5: Cost Isn’t an Issue

“But video is expensive!” is another common objection to having a video portfolio.

Once upon a time, this was true. But nowadays, even if you can’t afford a professional videographer, there’s really no excuse. Smartphones even film in HD! (Just be sure to hold them horizontally – vertical videos are bad.)

Furthermore, taking a step up from a smart phone isn’t prohibitive like it once was, either. DSLR cameras can cost less than $500, and if you want to invest in sound as well as picture (which is a good idea), Zoom microphones can also be bought for less than $500. That means you can start filming quality videos of your students’ performances for less than $1000. It’s an investment, to be sure. But not an outrageous one.

#6: The Proof of the Pudding…

Let your students’ fingers do the talking in your marketing.

Video portfolios clearly demonstrate a music teacher’s expertise. You’ve heard the adage “the proof of the pudding is in the eating”? Well the proof of a teacher’s skills is in their students’ playing.

Even one of my 8 year old students has her own YouTube channel!

 

Eleena Li Piano Channel

 

#7 – Video is a Social Media WIN

In the world of social media, visual posts generate more “likes”, comments, clicks, and “engagement”.

According to a 2014 study by Quintly, videos on Facebook Pages garner more interactions and engagement than images, statuses, links, and cover photos. Despite making up an average of 3% of all posts, videos receive a disproportionate share of attention on social media.

As such, having a video portfolio with videos you can share on your different social media platforms can help your pages to stand out and get attention. And of course, YouTube itself is a social media platform through which people can discover you – after all, it’s the world’s second most popular search engine after Google.

#8: Actions Speak Louder Than Words

Have you ever visited the website of a famous singer, musician, or band where they simply told you how good they were? Of course not. Instead, they show you with videos. And if others in the music industry have videos demonstrating their expertise, why shouldn’t music teachers do the same?

#9: It Sets You Apart

To my knowledge, there’s one other piano teacher in Hurstville, Sydney with a video portfolio: Jackie Sharp. (You can see her YouTube channel here.) She’s also the author of Purrfect Practice.

By having video portfolios, Jackie and I have set ourselves apart from other music teachers. It’s a point of difference. And it’s a point of difference my clients love. I know, because they tell me about it.

 

Purrfect Practice

 

Over to You

If you’re a music teacher, do you have a video portfolio? If not, why not?

As a student or parent, do you appreciate being able to watch student performances?

Piano Fingers – Video Portfolio Showcase

Would you like to see the Le Piano Academy video portfolio? You’ll find it on our showcase page, entitled “Piano Fingers”. Piano Fingers includes video recordings of my students’ live performances at our studio’s annual piano recital. These students range in age from young children, to adults. Some are beginners, others intermediates, and others have been studying piano with me for years. So go have a look, and let me know what you think!

[shareaholic app=”share_buttons” id=”7262185″]